“What have I learned from all this?” – Marketing Manfesto – #1

 

A Marketing Manifesto

I believe marketing is a “method” that combines both art and science. It is a game of continually seeking truth that you have to be determined to win.  You must use both your left and right brain hemispheres to really gain truth. To be a great marketer, you have to be brave, take chances, make mistakes, live with those mistakes, and stay in the game despite any discomfort you experience on the way. You have to push your mind outside of your “box” every single day.

You have to do yoga and climb mountains.

You have to be passionate and be calculating.

You have to believe everything and believe nothing.

And most of all, you have to learn about yourself. For in turning inwards you free yourself to understanding truths about the world.

And that can make you great at marketing (…and just about anything else in life, too.)

Paul Kurucz

A Marketing Manifesto

10 principles and practices of great marketing:

#1:  People buy emotions, not products.

 

People want to feel things from their products and services. They don’t buy things for the function delivered, but rather for how their purchases will make them feel.

Give me an example…

No, this not some purchases or many purchases, but all purchases.  Hard to believe?  Check out this example of what most people would consider a boring, functional product:

(How can he hold a lit bulb?)
(How can he hold a lit bulb?)

A person buys a light bulb. A functional purchase, right?  No emotions involved?

Not really:  When a light bulb burns out and a person replaces it, how do they feel?

Some possibilities:

  • “When see a light bulb dark and burnt out, I feel that my home is neglected and I feel bad about that.”
  • “I feel depressed when it is dim and dark in my home.”
  • “When I get a new light bulb, I feel happy that my home is bright again.”
  • “I enjoy reading. When I change the light bulb, I can read more easily again.”
  • “I feel great buying low energy consuming light bulbs because I feel good contributing to conservation. When light bulb burns out it gives me an opportunity to replace it with a better one.”

See the point? Every one of those reasons has a foundation in feelings – one or more emotion.

So what?

When you consider that every single product or service is really a delivery vehicle for emotions, you can  focus on helping people feel the emotions they want to feel through your product or service!

Continuing our example of the light bulb, if you keep the emotion(s) in mind that buyers of light bulbs want to feel, there are some really simple things you can do in marketing to help them feel the emotion(s):

    • Have your light bulbs available wherever people feel they are buying things to help them feel they are caring for their home.
    • Illustrate and describe on the light bulb package how your light bulbs will help a purchaser feel.
What is nicer than a great book...under a warm light bulb?
What's nicer than a great book...under a warm light bulb?
  • Dark packaging? Ummm…no. How about bright, colorful, cheerful packaging?  After all people aren’t buying darkness – they are buying light!  Illustrate this in packaging!
  • Packaging and advertising can show scenarios where people feel emotions. How about a picture of a person sitting under a warm light reading a book with a smile of contentment on their face?
  • Association is a powerful marketing tool. Put the color green, with a picture of green trees and the word “green” on your light bulb packaging and “VOILA!”:  People get the happy feeling of being associated with the energy conscious generation and doing the “right” thing, a very satisfying feeling for many.

Two challenges with the “emotional delivery” approach to marketing:

1.  You have to figure out what emotions people want to feel. This is no easy task: First, you have to get your own emotional beliefs out the way about the product/service – your own biases. Then you have to dig deep to really understand the emotional underpinnings. Most people don’t want to talk about their buying behavior this way: It leads to uncomfortable feelings that include “why am I buying this anyway? Am I that simple?”  So you have to be an emotional detective to really get to truth. A really good one.

2.  Most business people, including many marketers, don’t understand the emotional core of marketing. Somewhere along the line business became about the scientific method, financial accounting, and statistical process control. All good things, but not great to use as primary tools in the messy world of “emotions”.

So, once you get some great insights into the emotional products that people want, you have to then spend the next 6 months explaining, convincing, re-explaining, and explaining again what you are talking about to those who think that marketing the product/service is mechanical.   “Arggghhh….!!!”

Welcome to Marketing:

50% hard work figuring out what emotions people want to feel and how your product/service can help them get those feelings.

And 50% hard work getting your graphic designer, engineer, boss, accountant, banker, and mother to understand what you are talking about.


3 Replies to ““What have I learned from all this?” – Marketing Manfesto – #1”

  1. Thank you for sharing your well thought and written article on the state of emotional buying. The example of the light bulb really hit home with me as it gives a very well outlined example of customer’s need to purchase your products, or services. Most Internet marketers don’t realize that 50% of marketing is actually about meeting the customer’s needs and not their business. I believe when people start to understand human behavior and what impulse drives people to buy what they do, then half their battle is over. Thank you for your sound knowledge and wisdom.

    KevinR @ MyCreativeSuccess.com

  2. Education is definately a vital field, because everything in civilization relies upon education. I saw that on a website someplace — a non-profit organization in the Philippines. Teachers work tirelessly at their craft (many of them, anyway). But there are several who seem to have a gift to inspire. My senior high school world history teacher was one of those. She had lived in China as a growing up. When she taught in Rockville, Maryland, you could potentially feel the wisdom of all her experience. She didn’t have us memorize dates. That was the first really good thing I had heard from a history teacher. What she said next took the subject several magnitudes higher in value. She wanted us to be familiar with the motivations of history — the deeply visceral, human facets of what can somewhat be a deadly dry subject. Jaime Escalante of “Stand and Deliver” fame, dared to dream big. Calculus for the typically dropout crowd? Pushing them to go on to college? Wow. And I have this publication called, “Calculus Made Easy,” by Sylvanus P. Thompson, first published in 1910. It’s been through lots of printings all to generate an uncomplicated subject simple. What can we do to create more teachers who inspire world-changing quality? Einstein once declared that imagination is a lot more important than knowledge. Knowledge can give you the building blocks. Imagination can take you to the stars. Don’t our children deserve better?

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