Moving Back to Canada
Moving Back to Canada

Health Care in Canada

How Canada's health care system is different from the U.S. system


Understanding how the medical system in Canada works - family doctors, walk-in clinics, hospitals, pharmacies, and public health insurance (such as MSP in BC and OHIP in Ontario) - is important for Canadians planning their move back to Canada and for people moving to Canada for the first time.

The purpose of this resource is to provide practical information to help you understand the most important aspects of the Canadian health care system - those parts you may need to access. I have worked with dozens of clients who shared medical system questions and concerns after their many years living in the U.S., for example, and these questions and concerns caused them much anxiety. Not knowing if you will be safe in the Canadian health care system when you intimately understand and trust another country's system can be worrying, especially if you have serious and chronic health concerns.

Please share your thoughts and experiences with the Canadian health care system to help improve this resource.

Core Differences and Key Facts


Canada USA
Who pays: The government of the province you live in pays almost of your emergency and most of your elective health/medical care. There are a variety of ways that your emergency medical and most of your elective care will be paid. Government, private health insurance companies, personal payments, and even donations are sources of money.
My costs? You may have to pay a modest monthly cost for your health care insurance. In BC, a single adult pays $75 per month currently. Low income households, students, and others do not have to pay. Depending on your income and circumstances, you may have to pay hundreds or even thousands of dollars a month for your health care insurance.
What is covered? Your hospital care, specialist visits, most of your pharmaceuticals, and some extra costs are covered. A variety of things are covered...or not covered. The system in the U.S. is complex and private health insurers have a profit incentive to pay for as little as possible. This means that every private health insurance plan coverage is different.
What is not covered? Eye care and dental care are not covered by public health care in Canada. Optical care is often covered in the U.S., but dental is not usually covered by health care insurance.
Pharmaceuticals: A few pharmaceuticals available in the U.S are not available in Canada. Doctors here will assess your health situation and likely prescribe the same pharmaceuticals or a protocol that will very well meet your needs. Pharmaceuticals are generally lower in price in Canada than in the U.S. Almost all pharmaceuticals are available in the U.S. and are regularly prescribed by doctors for your needs. Pharmaceuticals are generally higher in price in U.S. than in Canada.
Philosophy: Canada's system is based on a "priority of need" philosophy. The U.S. system is based on a "fastest treatment" philosophy.
Wait times: Myth: There are long waits for emergency care, including surgeries. Fact: There are no long waits in Canada when you have a real emergency that is life threatening. You get immediate care. Fact: You will have to wait for most elective surgeries in Canada. You can get immediate emergency care. You can get fast elective surgeries and treatments.
Quality: Canada has modern, up-to-date hospitals with some of the newest and highest quality equipment available. Doctors, nurses, and other medical staff are world class. The U.S. has modern, up-to-date hospitals with some of the newest and highest quality equipment available. Doctors, nurses, and other medical staff are world class
Advocacy: Having someone help you navigate the health care system in Canada, and advocate for you, is very advisable, especially in an emergency. The system is complex. Having someone help you navigate the health care system in U.S., and advocate for you, is very advisable, especially in an emergency. The system is complex.
Just for context: Physician earnings. Doctors in Canada earn on average about CAD $340,000, minus the costs of operating their practices (subtract 30% +/-). Family doctors earn less than specialists. There are some hospital employee doctors, but most run their own practices or work out of shared drop-in clinics. Doctors in the U.S. earn on average USD $380,000 (CAD $475,000), minus the costs of operating their practices (subtract 30% +/-). Family doctors earn substantially less than specialists. Many doctors work for private hospitals. Many work in their own or shared practices.


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's)


  1. "Can I get a family doctor in Canada? I heard they were impossible to find now."

    The concept of a "family doctor" is fading in Canada, so yes, it is harder to find a traditional family doctor now.

    Why is it changing?

    • A family doctor who knows you, your life context, and your health situation, is an artifact from the past. Except for some very small towns and villages, it is almost impossible for a doctor to have the time to get to know you and your life, and connect that to your health. Doctors are paid to help many people, not a few, and with the demands on them, they must spend just the minimum amount of time necessary to address your immediate health concerns.

    • Specialists have more time to address your complex and chronic health concerns. Family doctors will typically refer you to emergency departments at a hospital for emergencies and specialists for more complex health concerns.

    • You have more power to understand your own general medical concerns today, thanks to the internet. Family doctors used to educate you in the past, but this is not so necessary now. Another reason they can spend less time with you.

    • Being a doctor used to be a "vocation". Now it is a "job" for many. With this fundamental shift in philosophy comes a real change in how doctors wish to work. They want time off, a life with their families, and after all the years they have to study to become a doctor, they want to enjoy the rewards of their "profession".

    What is replacing the "family doctor" in Canada?

    Drop-in clinics are replacing the role of a family doctors. You can even now have continuity of attention and care at a drop-in medical clinic. The difference is that you don't typically have a sole relationship with a specific doctor, but with the clinic itself. While this may seem impersonal, it is reality.

    I heard an explanation shared by an older family doctor as to why younger doctors are practicing in drop-in clinics and not starting their own independent family practices: It is easier administratively, reduces their reporting requirements to the government, It is cheaper to work out of a drop-in clinic, and it allows them to treat their work as a "job", not a 24x7 vocation.

  2. "When can we get public health insurance after we move to Canada?"

    Most large population provinces have a 3 month waiting period. You sign up for health insurance when you get here and 3 months later you are insured. In the meantime, you will need to get private "visitors to Canada insurance" or be covered by your current health care insurance.

  3. "How long are the health care "waiting times" in Canada...really?"

    Please note that the spreading of FUD (Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt) about the Canadian health care system is prevalent in the U.S. Why? Because the health insurance, medical, and pharma system in the U.S. is primarily a multi-trillion dollar business (yes, trillion and yes, a business). There are huge vested interests in keeping it private and profitable in the U.S., unlike the Canadian system, which is mostly "public funded and privately delivered", which balances the power between the government "protecting" the public and the desires for profit in the private delivery. And there are fundamental philosophical mindframe differences, too, between Canada and the U.S. that encourage fear, derision, and outright mis-information about the Canadian health care system being portrayed publicly in the U.S.

    Fact: You will get immediate care for your life threatening emergencies. No waits.

    The philosophical differences also lead to many people in the U.S. having a "customer" perspective of health care, with attendant expectations. In Canada we have a "priority of need" perspective. This is a very important difference to be aware of, if you are used to customer service in the U.S. medical system. In Canada you will get prompt, respectful, professional, and very human care. But you will much less likely to be considered a "customer", as you would in the U.S., and this has a direct impact on perceptions of wait times for service.

    The following anecdote shared with me in 2017 highlights the different exectations and concerns that arise at the patient interface of the Canadian and U.S. medical systems:

    ...mandatory referrals and wait times to see specialists [in Canada] and great difficulty locating a family doctor. CT scans and MRI’s, which are frequent for me, seem to take weeks to schedule and even longer to be read and have the specialist follow up. All of this is a totally different matter in ________ [USA] where we both have our own team of specialists who liaise and share data with our internist but operate completely separately. Blood test and CT scans are scheduled in a day or two. 4 hours later we get the radiologists report and the scan. Blood test results are available online to us within 24 hours. So, you see the Canada scene is looking very different and very frustrating.
    If you are dealing with chronic and/or serious health concerns while living in the U.S., or further abroad, and are used to the speed of treatment for all your needs there, please think carefully about when to move back to Canada...or whether to move back at all. The last thing you need is aggravation of your health concerns and unnecessary worry while having to learn to navigate the Canadian health care system. Long waiting times in Canada for non-emergency specialist services are real.

  4. "Will I be covered by Canadian public health insurance when I travel outside of Canada or "snowbird" in the U.S.?"

    You will not be fully covered by Canadian health care insurance when you travel or snowbird outside of Canada. You will have to purchase private "top-up" insurance to cover your travels and time outside of Canada.

    Note: You must be resident in Canada for most of the year to be covered by Canadian health care, and stay covered. It varies a bit by province, but typically this is 6 months at least.

  5. Are vaccinations covered by public health insurance and are they required for public school and work in Canada?

    Vaccinations are a complex and very contentious topic right now, both in Canada and in the U.S., so just the facts:

    • In general, vaccinations are paid for by Canadian health insurance.

    • Some vaccinations are required for public school entry. Exemptions and work-arounds are possible in many jurisdictions in Canada.

    • Some workplaces, such as nursing homes, require staff to either have vaccinations or use a face mask.

Further Help


Health care is a complex topic in Canada, the U.S., the UK, and in many other countries.

If you are planning to move back to Canada, or move here for the first time, please educate yourself about the Canadian health care system.

If I can be of support for your move to Canada, and your understanding of the Canadian health care system as part of that move, please engage my professional support services. I will be pleased to help!

Contributions & Feedback, please!


This resource is updated regularly, but the topic of health care in Canada is so big, and so complex, that not everything can be explained fully and some things will change each year.

Please contribute your learning and experiences, and suggest improvements, so that other Canadians moving back to Canada, and those moving here for the first time, may benefit from your wisdom.

Thank you!

Paul Kurucz

Latest update to this resource: November 2017



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