Moving Back to Canada
Moving Back to Canada

For Canadian Citizens:  Careers and Jobs in Canada

Many people want to get a job in Canada when they return, or when they come for the first time (a spouse who hasn't lived in Canada, for example). And they want to find a job in Canada quickly, for financial and stability reasons. If this describes you, here are some questions, thoughts, and resources that may be of help in re-establishing your career and getting a job in Canada.

The following resource is are broken down into three parts:


Part 1: You and your skills

Part 2: The nature of work in Canada and the Canadian job market

Part 3: Making the right career, job, or venture happen quickly for you

Part 1: You and your skills

job titles

Most people define their skills as the title of what they do. For example:

"I am an accountant. I have accounting skills."

"I am an engineer. I have engineering skills."

"I am a teacher. I have teaching skills."

The problem? This narrow definition of what you do, as dictated by the title of your chosen occupation, limits your job and career prospects. I suggest a wider definition of who you are and what your skills really are. In other words, you are more than a job or occupation title. Even if the title gives you a lot of comfort and self worth, suspend it for a while in your mind and trust that consideration of your deeper skills will broaden and deepen your self-worth.

Make a list of what you can really do and see what kind of jobs might utilize those skills. Example:

Title: "Accountant"

Skills:


Possible jobs that could use those skills:

Do you see the difference? Now you have vastly more job possibilities than just "accountant"!

"But I don't want to process car loans or be a "Car loan officer"! I want to do accounting and be called an 'accountant'! "

I worked with someone who was absolutely driven to be an English teacher (ESL) at a university or college in the city she had arrived at in Canada. Nothing I could say or do would convince her to consider anything else. To her, anything else was not appropriate or acceptable.

This woman suffered. Literally years went by until she finally got a part-time job teaching English at a private language school. Not a university or college - a private language school. Dozens of applications, countless hours of networking, self-worth doubts, and unhappiness for all involved from the waiting. Everyone suffered - her family for a lack of income and living with her unhappiness, her friendships, and most importantly, herself. Was it worth the wait? Was it worth sticking to her beliefs about who she "was" and what title she should have, instead of allowing her mind to change and grow and to think more widely and flexibly? You be the judge...

"But I don't have a 'financial analyst' credential. I have a certificate that proves I am an 'accountant'!"

There are some jobs that require very specific qualifications. But most do not require exactly the qualification for the job title! This is again where a narrowing of potential careers and jobs happens in our mind: We assume that a 'financial analyst' must have a "financial analyst certificate'. Not true! Employers are looking more for your skills, attitude, and interpersonal skills than for your proof of your education.

Again, letting go of job titles and education certificates can make you feel vulnerable. If you are in this situation and you can be brave enough to let go of them for the purposes of considering other options, you will likely find that the amazing opportunities you uncover will reward you for your bravery. Trust that you are more than your job title or educational background. Let that "more" come out and you will find bigger and faster success in getting a job in Canada and establishing a career.

Part 2: Work in Canada and the Canadian job market


jobs in Canada

Canada is a relatively simple country, job-wise. With only 35 million people spread over a massive geographic area, there are simply not as many jobs in specialized fields in Canada as there might be in a country with a larger population in a more condensed geographic area. For example, if you have skills in a very special engineering field, you may find there are only 2 people doing your work in Vancouver and 3 more in Toronto, which is 5000km away! And there are simply not a lot of job openings for your skills.

Compounding the population size and geographic issues is the nature of Canada: A country of rich natural resources and pretty simple thinking. Most wealth and jobs are in a very few sectors:


The general mind set of Canada is that a good life is a simple process:

  1. Get a stable job (in one the above sectors)
  2. Get a car loan and mortgage to buy a house.
  3. Raise a family.
  4. Retire

And the job market reflects this simplicity, as a whole. Canada is less entrepreneurial than America, less strategic than Germany, Switzerland, and Japan in their investment in the future, and less hard working than China.

No judgment here, just some hard facts to help you focus your job search in the right areas. Implications:


An Alternative!

An alternative: The above is a generalization. It applies to most people and places. However, there is another side to the Canadian job market that is very vibrant and can offer amazing opportunities: Small business. Small businesses are often overlooked by people coming to Canada. Most people look for jobs in big organizations in larger cities. These jobs are assumed to pay more, be more stable and allow new immigrants to live near family and culturally related friends. However, this is not always true! Big organizations do not always pay the best, they don't always allow for mobility and learning, and you can get "stuck" in them. And living costs in big cities are often much higher than in smaller cities and towns. Any gains in salary for working for a large organization might be wiped out by the higher costs of living in a large city!

Benefits of jobs with small businesses:


Another Alternative!

Another alternative: If you find a need in Canada that is not being met, consider starting your own business!

For example, if you speak and write Portuguese, this is a great time to offer Canadian businesses help in exporting to Brazil. As a consultant, translator, marketer, representative, or contractor, you have something to offer.

Another example: If you cook great Indian food, and you move to a bigger city that doesn't have an Indian restaurant in your part of town, research if a need exists for one.

These are just examples to get you thinking that starting your own business as an option.

"But I don't have any money to invest to start my own business!"

Most business startups require little or no investment - just time and effort. Those that do require investment? There are tons of potential investors in Canada. Preparation is needed before you approach investors, but money is available for investment.

Success Orientations:

I can't resist including a really simple way of looking at the Canadian job market and how you might best fit in: Success Orientations.

There are three main orientations. Each of us thinks and acts from one main orientation and to a lesser extent one secondary one:


Jobs are just the same! Most jobs explicitly fit within one of the three orientations:


Which orientation is your dominant one?

Which type of job might be the best fit for you?

(Can you see which Success Orientation is evident in most jobs in Canada, based on the industries noted as being the biggest in Canada?)

Learn more about Success Orientations...

Part 3: Making the right career, job or venture happen quickly for you


"What takes 3 months to accomplish in Dubai takes 3 years to accomplish in North America"

There is some truth to this statement when applied to Canada. When I was living in Dubai, a new graduate from my alma mater (the university I attended), contacted me to see if I could help him find a job there. My advice was for him to come for a week or two and scout for work. He followed my suggestion and came for two weeks. By the end of the first week, he had secured a position with a top company, earning $100,000 per year to start.

In Canada, the same job hunt could take months. Why? Well, in Part 2, above, we explored how different types of employment come about in Canada. Applied to the situation, above, here is why the recent graduate got a job so quickly in Dubai - a job that might have taken months to secure in Canada (if ever):


Key ways to get a job in Canada (relatively) quickly:


A. Be here.

Remote hiring - getting a job before you arrive back in Canada - doesn't really happen much. Most applications from non-local applicants are rejected immediately, unless there are very special requirements for the position and a nation-wide or international hunt for the right skills is needed.

Why? A few reasons:

I. There are normally too many applicants. Screening then, is designed to get rid of applications, so reviewers can have a manageable number to actually review. Shocking, right? Well it is true.


II. It is now common knowledge that people "fish" for jobs. If they get an offer, then they consider seriously if they would leave their current job, lifestyle, and geographic location. As a result of so many applicants declining offers that organizations say to themselves: Why put out a lot of effort for someone who is only casually fishing? We make an offer and then they decide "Nah. I like living near my mother-in-law in Timbuktu. No thanks."


III. A remote hire means relocation - costs and time to settle and get up to speed productivity-wise. Which equals high costs and low productivity for some time.

Solution:

The key is to be here. Travel to Canada or move back here ahead of your family and make face-to-face contact with people. Network. Apply with a local address.

Sorry, no easy way around that. You have to invest your time and effort locally.

Again, remote hiring can take place if you have contacts in a very specific field - game design, for example, or bridge engineering, or particle physics. And you have very special skills and experience to offer. For the rest of us? You normally have to be local. A visit for 2-3 weeks can get the ball rolling. You demonstrate that you are local and ready to commit.

B. Go where the jobs are

The farther you are from the jobs you are targeting based on your education, skills, and experience, the longer it will take to get the job you want.

If getting a job in Canada is a top priority on your list - and particularly if you want one fast - go to where the jobs are in Canada. Big cities are your best bet. Secondary cities that have a strong presence in the industry you are seeking to gain a job in should be your next consideration.

This means your first choices are:

Your second choices are:


C. Be in alignment with the hiring process for your industry, region, and culture.

Government? Process oriented.

Sales? Goal oriented.

Real estate? Relationship oriented.

Banking? Process oriented.

Per the Success Orientations model noted above, are you researching, targeting, and approaching the right kind of industries, companies, and jobs themselves, for who you really are?

"Yes, but banking is safe and there are a lot of jobs." If safety is your main concern in life, then by all means: Get a job in a bank.

D. When looking for a job, help solve problems. Don't offer to be an expense

Consider these two approaches to looking for work::

Approach "A":

"I would like a job in your company."

Approach "B":

" I want to help you build sales. I have some ideas that can help you operate faster, more efficiently, and get more sales as a result."

What does a manager of company, for example, hear about you in the different approaches?

Approach "A": The manager hears this: "I would like to be an expense to you. May I become an expense to you?"

The manager, if they were to respond, would immediately say: "Thank you for offering to be an expense to me. I have enough expenses already."

Approach "B": The manager hears this: "This person might be able to help our company make more sales and cut costs, too." The manager, if they were to respond, would immediately say: "Sounds great! Would you come to my office tomorrow to discuss how you might help us?" (An interview!!!)


Your ideas, considerations, and experiences?

Please share your ideas, considerations, and experiences relating to returning to Canada from the USA. I will post them here as help for others. Along with a credit to you will be a big thank you on behalf of the many people you will be helping!

Thank you!

Paul Kurucz
Canada





Why am I writing this?

Over the last 16 years I have coached hundreds of people in their career development and job hunt in Canada. From groups of MBA students wanting to work in Canada to families from India wanting to emigrate to Canada in hopes of a better income and life - from new immigrant professionals to office clerks. I have worked with all professions.

What I have learned are the differences between those who struggled to get established in Canada, often for many years, and those who prospered with relative ease, often succeeding quite quickly.

My hope is that this section of the Moving Back to Canada web site will help you join the group of those who found great jobs in Canada, created wonderful careers, and prospered...quickly.

Paul Kurucz


Three things you must know about getting a job in Canada:

1. Some 90% of jobs never get advertised publicly.

2. Networking is the only way to access these jobs.

3. Applying to a publicly posted job (the other 10%) has the same odds of getting you a job as buying a lottery ticket is of winning you lots of money. In other words, almost no chance.

In summary, most people spend their time finding online job postings and submitting applications and resumes for those jobs.

This is an almost total waste of time, unless you have very, very special skills, experience, and education to offer to a specific posted job that requires these special attributes you have.

Networking, and learning how to network, is a 100 times better use of your time and effort.

"Yes, but I don't know anyone in Canada!"




How to Network when you don't know anyone in Canada

1. Target a specific industry you want to work in. Hopefully you are qualified, experienced, and/or simply interested in working in this industry.

2. Attend public events related to that industry. Also, attend industry events, like trade shows. These are the best places to get to know specific companies and meet real people who work there - people who can advocate for you and decide to hire you.

Note: I am not talking about "Job fairs", which seem to offer exactly what you are looking for. Job fairs do not allow you to network with decision makers - only with human resources staff, who are not decision makers. Job fairs are useful for gathering information, but not for networking. You want to talk to those who actually decide on who gets hired - managers, key employees, etc. Industry events are a great place to meet decision makers.

3. Get to know the geographic and virtual communities in which specific companies operate. Join service clubs, business groups, etc. Learn to speak the language of the industry, the companies who operate locally, and the people who work for them. Learn what challenges they have and the opportunities, too. A casual conversation at a service club meeting is more likely to lead to an interview than sending in a resume to a publicly posted job opening!



The only three things an interviewer really wants to know:

1. Can you do the job?

2. Can we get along with you?

3. Will you stay?

Really - that is all you are answering in any job interview. Nail those three questions and you have a great chance at getting the job!





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Have questions?


I offer professional support to help you prepare for a smooth and easy return to Canada so you can feel confident and organized!


Paul Kurucz

Paul Kurucz - Canada


A happy client:

Hi Paul,

Just to update you - we landed and sailed through customs! So thank you so much for all of your advice...It was a thoroughly pleasant experience...

... this is to say thank you for everything. Your advisory has been so incredibly helpful and saved us considerable time and removed room for error.

With best wishes,

Caroline

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